Construction workers on the frontline

Workers from the construction industry continue to put the plight of others before personal concerns...

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Construction workers put the plight of others before personal concerns.

It’s terminology we normally associate with a war zone, but ‘on the frontline’ has fast become part of today’s lexicon. The battle to combat the COVID-19 pandemic has forced NHS staff to become the modern day warriors – with postmen, bin-men, folk working the supermarket till or stacking shelves their able lieutenants. The Northern Ireland construction industry too, has volunteered for frontline service.

Companies like CTS (Connect – Transform – Sustain) have sent their staff into the heat of battle, donning the PPE uniform to ensure services are maintained for clients and customers, and issuing a message that, “We want to reach out and reassure you that in these unprecedented times due to COVID-19, we are doing everything in our power to keep these vital frontline services operational.”

H&J Martin Construction’s mobile engineers are still offering support to key workers and operations, dedication that has not gone unnoticed by the company’s Divisional Director, Kieron Millar. “From those that are supporting by helping protect the longevity of the business, to those who are providing support to front line operations, and finally to those providing front line operational services to key worker sites, there are too many to thank individually as it is everyone. What an organisation I have the privilege to lead.”

Pride is a common theme. For the hierarchy at Michael Nugent Ltd its respect for employees on the frontline at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Lagan Valley Hospital, Northern Ireland Fire & Rescue Service, and social care trusts.

For Mannings Northern Ltd the workforce that installed Perspex screens and floor markings to protect staff at Tesco. Whatever can be done to help is being done.

Take Woodvale Construction where Robert Ewing and Paul Devine donated and personally delivered 500 precious state-of-the-art FFP3 masks to Belfast City Hospital surgeons Tim Brown and Hannah McGowan. None of us can predict how long this crisis will last. What we can say with certainty is that the Northern Ireland construction industry will continue to be ready and willing to play its part.